January 2020 Reads

Fiction

To start off the New Year, I picked up The Vengekeep Prophecies by Brian Farrey. I bought this a long time ago, but didn’t get around to reading it until now. I thought it had some very smart twists and a great world-building. I warmed up to the Grimjinx family instantly, and I was a little disappointed that for most of the book, we don’t actually get to see them operate as a team. I think that’s really the only issue I had with the story, and perhaps it was why I found the middle to ‘sag’ a little. It had an awesome ending though.

Sorcery of Thorns was such a joy to read. It’s the kind of cozy fantasy that was perfect to read on a winter’s afternoon. The characters were all lovable and the romance went at the perfectly right pace for me. The plot was amazing, full of twists and turns. And yes, I have to mention this, being such a big fan of Fullmetal Alchemist, but the plot is very similar to FMA. Not that it takes away any enjoyment. On the contrary, picking up on the similar plot lines made me more excited to see how things would turn out in this world.

Read More »

October 2018 Books

Whoa, I was on a roll again last month! Let’s get to it

6609744

Kat Incorrigible by Stephanie Burgis

This book has been on my TBR list for a few years now, and it’s satisfying to finally get around to it.

Kat comes from a family with magic, which is lucky for her because her oldest sister is about to get married to a man rumoured to have murdered his previous wife.

I really love how packed this book is with action. It’s short, but so many things happen. I love Kat’s relationship with her sisters, how they don’t always get along, but deep down they have each others’ best interest at heart. I really enjoyed this book, and look forward to reading the rest of the series.

Read More »

July 2018 Books

The Secrets of Solace by Jaleigh Johnson

The Secrets of Solace is the 2nd book in the World of Solace Series. I read the first, Mark of the Dragonfly several years ago and I remember liking it very much. This book is a standalone like the first, dealing with an entirely different cast set in a different part of the world. In this book, we follow Lina, a young archivist, who finds a mysterious airship stuck in the tunnels of her home. She befriends a boy named Ozben who happens to be on the run from assassins.

I thought that this book had the same imaginative story and characters that the first book did, but it didn’t have the same sense of adventure. Perhaps because Lina and Ozben spend most of their time in the strongholds of the mountain where the archivists live. The plot enfolds only in that place until the climax. What I really liked about this book though is how Lina and Ozben’s character arcs intertwined.

Read More »

Leng’s 2017 Book Awards

2017books

Aaaand it’s that time of the year again! This is the point in the year where I look at the fiction I’ve read the previous year and give out some fake awards (according to my humble opinion of course). I’ve been doing this for several years in a row now. If you want to see previous years’ awards, I have a link here in my post last year.

This year’s candidates are shown in the neat little image above I captured from Goodreads. I faded out the nonfiction books I read, because these awards are geared towards fiction only. So without further ado, let’s get to it!

Warning: Spoilers abound!!

Read More »

October 2017 Reads

Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo

This is the sequel to Six of Crows. After the botched heist, Kaz Brekker and his crew of crows try to get back the money that Van Eck cheated from them. With risks higher than ever, and as old allies turn against them, Kaz launches his biggest plan yet.

Needless to say, I loved this. Loved SoC and this was an impeccable sequel. There was only one thing I didn’t like near the end, and I’m pretending it didn’t happen. Other than that, whoa, what a great ride. I’m adding this duology to my list of books with exemplar writing.

Read More »

September 2017 Reads

Wow, I think I made a reading record last month. 6 books! I’m notorious for being a slow reader, but I don’t know what I happened… I blew through 4 large books and 2 smaller ones.

7908762

Troubled Waters by Sharon Shinn

This book got me out of my reading slump. It’s about a noble girl who lived most of her life in exile, until her father died and she was brought back to court life. As someone who is an elemental mage, she holds a lot of power and soon she finds herself embroiled in intrigue.

I love how character-centric this was. Even though much of the plot isn’t action-oriented, I was always wondering what’s going to happen to Zoe next. Zoe was a likeable character, though I think for a character-oriented book, it kind of lacked a character arc.

One of the plot twists that I was afraid of happening happened in the last 5 pages of the book, which was… erm, a bit of a let down. So overall, I enjoyed this book lots except for a few parts, and thank it very much for pulling me out of my reading slump.

Read More »

Gap Books

I saw this today over at Shannon Hale’s twitter:

Please read the entire thread! It touches upon some important issues I feel strongly about in the children and YA publishing industry.

2017 May Reads

Alright, in an effort to liven up this blog from my incessant writing woes posts, I’m going to take a moment to talk about some of the books I’ve read this month so far. I think if I read really quickly, I might be able to read one more book before the month is up.

27833542

 Story Genius by Lisa Cron

I’ve been having a lot of difficulty writing the first draft of my story, mostly because I had a hard time really writing from any of my characters’ perspectives. This book was recommended to me in response to that.

I think the most valuable lesson I learned in this book is how every story that captivates readers sufficiently is ultimately a character-driven story. I’ve read many writing books before, and some of them distinguish between “plot-driven” and “character-driven” stories. In Story Genius, Lisa Cron explains why any kind of meaningful story is actually character-driven, no matter if the plot has tons of exciting things going on.

I know, it’s not a ground-breaking concept. Even in my own reading experience, I tend to gravitate towards books where I sympathized with characters the most. And I think her explanation brings home why this is so: an event in a story (in other words, the actual plot) has very little meaning unless the character gives us a context in which to make sense of that event. So really, even your most plot-driven story, if it’s good, is actually anchored by the protagonist.

Read More »

2017 Jan – Apr Books Read So Far

Ahh, well, I guess my plan of getting back into writing book reviews in the new year sort of fell through. That’s okay though, here’s a combined post of everything I’ve read so far.

40158

The Queen of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner
This one is a reread. The Queen’s Thief series is my favourite book series ever, but the last time I read this book was a few years ago. Because of the new installment in the series next month, I’ve joined the read-along over at Sounis.

The Thief of Eddis is captured by the Queen of Attolia when he was spying for his queen. After suffering a cruel punishment, Eugenides struggles with his identity amidst the onslaught of war and the possibility of… uhm, I don’t want to spoil it for you guys. This is a terrible overview of the plot, but each book in the Queen’s Thief series in general is difficult to summarize, because of the risk of revealing crucial plot twists.

Since my last reread, I’ve forgotten much of the intricacies of the plot. That’s why it’s probably not much of a shock that I found myself reacting to Attolia in much the same way I initially reacted to her. I hated her at first, and then by the end of the book, I just wanted to cuddle her up. I think it’s a testament to Turner’s amazing writing skills that I could undergo this transformation as a reader, not just once, but twice.

Read More »